Jean Eid

Jean Eid  is an Associate Professor in the economics department at the School of Business and Economics,  Wilfrid Laurier University.  His research interests include industrial organization, health economics, and urban  economics. 

Born in Lebanon, he moved to Canada in 1989 where he completed his undergraduate degree in Economics. Eid  obtained his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Toronto in 2007. 

 
 Jean Eid's photo  Address:   School of Business and Economics
Department of Economics
Wilfrid Laurier University
75 University Avenue West
Waterloo, Ontario
N2L 3C5
Canada
Phone:   +1 519 884 0710 ext. 2262
Fax:   +1 519 888 1015
Email:   jeid@wlu.ca
Website:   http://www.jeaneid.org
 
 
Research    |  CV (PDF)  |  Teaching  

Research

Working Papers

  bullet image 'Competition Between Not-For-Profit and For-Profit Hospitals in Small Markets' 

Publications

Articles
  'Interregional Price Difference in The New Orleans' Auctions Market for Slaves' with Eugene Choo.  Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, forthcoming
'Fat City: Questioning the relationship between urban sprawl and obesity' , with Henry G. Overman, Diego Puga, and Matthew A. Turner. Journal of Urban Economics, forthcoming.

These papers can be downloaded in Adobe's portable document format (PDF). They can be viewed and printed with an Acrobat reader (free from Adobe).

*   'Competition Between Not-For-Profit and For-Profit Hospitals in Small Markets',
October 2006

ABSTRACT: This paper examines the relationship between how hospital owner ship is organized and the intensity of competition in the health care market. I study the question using an empirical entry model.  These models typically exhibit multiple equilibria. To resolve this problem, a novel algorithm that  computes all the equilibria of the game is developed. This paper uses the algorithm together with two different equilibrium  selection rules to estimate the parameters of interest. My findings suggest that for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals are differentiated.  I use my estimates to simulate two counterfactuals. First, I study a market were only not-for-profit hospitals exists. The results suggest a decrease in the level of health services. Second, I study a market were not-for-profit firms do not enjoy any tax shelters. I again find a decrease in the level of health services. I conclude that mixed markets are beneficial to consumers.  

The most recent working paper version is available for download as a PDF file (272 Kb.)

*   'Interregional Price Difference in The New Orleans' Auctions Market for Slaves' with Eugene Choo.
March 2007.

ABSTRACT: Our paper investigates the variation of winning bids in slave auctions held in New Orleans from 1804 to 1862. Specifically, we measure the variation in the price of slaves conditional on their geographical origin. Previous work using a regression framework ignored the auction mechanism used to sell slaves. This introduced a bias in the conditional mean of the winning bid since it depended on the number of bidders participating in the auction. Unfortunately, the number of bidders is unobserved by the econometrician. We adopt the standard framework of a symmetric independent private value auction and propose an estimation strategy to attempt to deal with this omitted variable bias. Our estimate of the mean number of bidders doubled from 1804 to 1862. We find the number of bidders had a significant positive effect on the average winning bid. An increase from 20 to 30 bidders in an auction raised the average winning bid by around 10 percent. The price variation according to the geographical origin of slaves found in earlier work continues to persist after accounting for the omitted variable. We also find a new result that a considerable premium is paid for slaves originating from New Orleans. However, this price variation disappears once we account for regional productivity differences.

The most recent working paper version is available for download as a PDF file (443 Kb.)

NOTE:  Please note that thanks to Pritchett and LaPoint, we discovered a minor error in our paper. It is in section 6.2 page  500. The test should not be rejecting the Allchien and Allen theorem and there is some evidence to support it. There was also another typo in that paragraph. For a complete correction please see here

* 'Fat City: Questioning the relationship between urban sprawl and obesity',
with  Henry G. Overman, Diego Puga, and Matthew A. Turner.
CEPR discussion paper 6191, March 2007.
ABSTRACT: We study the relationship between urban sprawl and obesity. Using data that tracks individuals over time, we find no evidence that urban sprawl causes obesity. We show that previous findings of a positive relationship most likely reflect a failure to properly control for the fact the individuals who are more likely to be obese choose to live in more sprawling neighborhoods. Our results indicate that current interest in changing the built environment to counter the rise in obesity is misguided.

The most recent working paper version is available for download as a PDF file (302 Kb.)


 
Research    |  CV (PDF)  |  Teaching  

jeid at wlu dot ca
This page was last modified 04 January 2007